Exploring Shared Housing Information Session

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The ugly duckling modular home

From myth to reality: the beautiful truth about modular homes

You know the childhood story – the ugly duckling that was picked on by his barnyard friends until one day he matured into a beautiful swan…. that story. In much the same way, modular homes have gone through the same transformation.  Modular homes have been around since the 1950s, starting because of the demand for homes after World War II.  At the beginning, it was function over form so the “ugly duckling” vision of modular homes stuck.  Years of misinformation and confusing modular homes with mobile homes still has many avoiding modular homes for all the wrong reasons. Here’s the truth about modular homes and why you should consider this beautiful swan.

First and foremost, it would surprise many that the home I live in is a modular.  Here’s a pic:

Why the surprise? Because of the myths surrounding modular homes.  So, let’s break that down:

  1. Modular homes are NOT mobile homes.  Unlike mobile homes, modular homes DO appreciate in value, their resale value is good and they do last longer than mobile (i.e., manufactured homes).
  2. Modular homes do not all look the same.  You can customize each and every feature of your home just as you would a site built home. The difference is that the construction is faster because it is built inside in sections and then delivered rather than being built onsite where weather and construction schedules lengthen the construction time.  Another advantage of being built inside is that they are “green” meaning they have a lower negative impact to the environment. Most importantly, you can incorporate Universal Design elements in your customization.  (Curious about Universal Design? Click here to read our blog about it).
  3. Modular homes can be financed just like site built homes because they, too, do not depreciate like a mobile home.  In addition, because construction time is often less, the finance costs to the homebuyer are also less.
  4. Modular homes are NOT cheap.  You can customize your modular home with the same high end finishes and coverings as you would a traditional home but they can be 10 to 35% cheaper than a site built home.

If you are considering downsizing your home and building a smaller home or considering moving into a planned pocket neighborhood community then you should consider modular homes as a way of saving your savings, having all the customization you want and seeing faster results.

Summer and Fall classes on Guidebook – Asheville

Your Quest for Home

 Here are the happy faces of those who completed the Guidebook Summer session at our potluck social after four intense sessions intense together. We didn’t want to say goodbye and also wanted to see Sheila’s amazing home and gardens. No wonder she is conflicted about her next steps. Like many of us, who like our current homes and stuff, we can’t imagine leaving anytime soon. Yet, there is that small voice saying, “Don’t wait, start now!”
Eight of us gathered at my little house in North Asheville for a jam packed one and a half (1 1/2) hours every 2 weeks or so. The dates were decided before hand and most everyone made all of the sessions, which is really important.

Class participants comments afterwards:

“Being in Marianne’s workgroup, Quest for Home, was very beneficial to me at this juncture of my life.  Not only did the exercises in the book, once I actually did them, give me clarity that I was looking for, but hearing other’s concerns and experiences gave me insight into my own journey.  The sharing of experiences helped us see that the obstacles we are encountering are not just our own or our lack of ability or experience but are shared among most women.
Highly recommend!” Marty Knight
 “The workshop was invaluable. Marianne is an excellent facilitator–attentive, perceptive, and organized–and the group bonded quickly. We all learned a lot about cohousing and a bit about ourselves. I’d recommend the workshop to anyone thinking about a cohousing community.” CT
“I got a lot out of the book and workshop, which helped me organize my thoughts as I consider and evaluate a very different living situation than I have now, an intentional community, rather than a single-family house model.  The constant reminder to “pay attention to what you don’t want as well as what you do” will become a litmus test as new ideas are considered.  First time through is an eye-opener, but I will go back to relevant sections over and over as I go forward.  I would not have done the exercises on my own, but working in a group showed me options I hadn’t considered, as well as giving me a schedule to work to.  Valuable experience!” Linda B.

Fall sessions starting soon!  The organizing meeting is September 13th.

For details: Click away!   Dates and times and fees:  http://wlicbook.womenforlivingincommunity.com/

 The Table of contents and a flavor for the Guidebook.
You can also purchase on Amazon or download on Kindle – click here
Talk and meet others on Wed, Sept 13 at 6:30pm at Earthfare West Community Room in Asheville to get a feel for the book, the author and others. Or email Marianne and sign up by Sept 24th, class size is limited. info@womenforlivingincommunity.com
If you are not in Asheville or surrounding area, or thinking it’s going to be cold out there to drive this winter?  The plan for future programs on the Guidebook will be to use of Zoom or some techie thing on the horizon. Stay tuned (by making sure you are subscribed to our website).
Is there a book sitting on your shelf? Hope it is this one and link. Take it down from the shelf and join us!

Summer Workshop Series based on Guidebook

Beginning this summer, Marianne will be leading workshops based on her guidebook, “Your Quest for Home: A Guidebook to Find the Ideal Community for your Later Years.”  Workshops are small (no more than 6 people) and will be hosted in her home over four weeks.  Each workshop is approximately 1.5 hours and is open to anyone.  Participants will be taken through the guidebook with assignments in a group setting allowing you to learn from each other as much as you learn about yourself.

Organizing Meeting Details

Interested? Not sure?  Attend the first organizing meeting on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 at Earth Fare from 6:30pm to 7:30pm.  The organizing meeting is free to attend. Ask questions, learn more and if you need to, buy a guidebook at the onsite price of $20.

If you wish to sign up, please attend the Organizing Meeting and bring workshop payment.

If you cannot attend but wish to sign up for the workshops, please email Marianne at info@womenforlivingincommunity.com.

Guided Workshops 

Once we have a full class, we will schedule the workshops to begin in June or July to be held on Tuesday evenings or Friday mornings.  Space is limited to 6 people to keep the workshops small and intimate as we work through important self-discovery questions and assignments.  Learning from each other is equally important in this small workshop setting.

The fee for all 4 workshops is $50.  If you can’t make the summer series, we will be scheduling a fall and winter series.

For full details, visit www.Quest4HomeBook.com

Questions? Email info@womenforlivingincommunity.com

Cottage Community, Intentional Community or Cohousing Development Opportunity in Asheville, NC

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Update
Here’s what I’ve been up to in the last year or so… in case you hadn’t heard, I purchased the property adjacent to my house in Asheville, NC  (original post about this is here: A New Beginning). It is over 2 acres of FLAT land in the mountains. I was ready and primed after all of my time in the Aging in Community movement to find a developer and architect to make my community dreams come true! I like to call it my pocket neighborhood dream community, it is pedestrian centric with smaller houses around a green.


Change of Plans
Now many site plans and conversations later, I’m putting the property up for sale to a more knowledgeable group or person. The costs and time required to fully develop are beyond my means, scope and desires at this time.


I’ve decided to sell the property but still hope to find a developer in the community movement interested in developing an intentional community or cohousing development or pocket neighborhood – a collaboration of trust and mutual interest.


I am letting you know in case, just maybe, you have a connection. You know that 6-degrees of separation thing? Here is my asking of you. Do you know anyone who might be interested? Or are YOU interested? That might look like a group, professional, investor, architect, builder or dreamer like me.  I’d still love to live the dream of having a community in my backyard, but I’ve realized that a development project is beyond me.


Property Information
The property is in a prime location in North Asheville and is flat and beautiful few trees and great for solar, at the end of a quiet peaceful cul-de-sac, qualities we wish to retain.

You can read more details about the property here: www.sunnysideasheville.com or you prefer like our Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/sunnysideasheville/
Feel free to send this information to your contacts or contact me at sunnyasheville@gmail.com
The Back Story
For those of you new to Women for Living in Community, here is the journey I’ve taken with this property:  A New Beginning: A dream becomes reality

5 Ways to Make Connections for 2016

I met a man who lives in Tennessee

He was headin’ for, Pennsylvania, and some homemade pumpkin pie

From Pennsylvania, folks are travelin’ down to Dixie’s sunny shore

From Atlantic to Pacific, gee, the traffic is terrific.

And…you know the rest.

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Women’s History Month: Patricia Goldman-Rakic

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Have you ever heard the name Patricia Goldman-Rakic? Probably not, but her work as a neurobiologist has almost certainly touched your life in some way.

It was Goldman-Rakic’s work on memory centers of the brain that allowed scientists to finally break the code on Alzheimer’s disease and several other common brain conditions. Her story came to an abrupt end in 2003 when she was struck by a car and died at the age of 66, still in the peak of her career.

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Women’s History Month: The Suffragettes

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I may have been a bit naïve when I decided to tackle this project during the month of March. I honestly believed that a simple Google search with a few keywords would get me to a wealth of information about women who were pioneers in building community. That was when I realized that what we, and multiple other trailblazers in community living, are doing is new and bold.

So I decided to take a step back.

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Pets in Community

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Earlier this month I posted about the 5 biggies in community. On that list the number one topic is discussing pets in a shared home. What if you do decide that pets are welcome? We all know pets are a big commitment but sometimes we don’t really think about how they will affect the other people in the house. Here are some things to consider before living with someone’s furry friend.

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New York Times and Community Living

Photo credit Mike Belleme for The New York Times

Photo credit Mike Belleme for The New York Times

On July 11th, the New York Times ran this article featuring myself, my shared home, and the Women for Living in Community network.

“We weren’t intended to drive into the garage and turn on the TV,” said Ms. Kilkenny, who is divorced and has no children. Instead, she believes “aging in community” is a viable alternative to growing older alone or in a more traditional situation, like marriage.

It was a fantastic experience to open our home to the photographer and reporter and have an opportunity to share our story. I encourage you to read the entire article at the New York Times site.

What are your thoughts on community living as we age? Leave a comment or join the conversation on Facebook.

 

Women For Living in Community