11 Video Examples & Discussions of Shared Housing Communities from Around the World

While shared housing has a lot of perks, doing it right can be a daunting task.

Personally, I find it helpful to remind myself of all of the successfully shared houses that there are out there. I’ve lived in some myself, and they’re a ton of them out there that I already know about. I also find out about new ones that I’ve never heard of all of the time.

That’s part of why I wanted to share the videos below with you. They’re just inspiring. But there’s another reason too.

People who have had success with shared housing have already been down a road that you may just be beginning. And most of them have learned the hard way what it takes to make this work. By listening to their stories, we can learn what really matters with this sort of thing and get actionable advice to make our own dreams a reality.

Ready to get inspired?

Here are several uplifting stories about thriving shared houses from around the globe.


This first video is of my friends and I living together in Asheville, North Carolina


This video shows the impact that shared housing has on people facing hard times, including homelessness in Dallas, Texas.


A beautiful example of multigenerational shared living from Australia


Australian news report covering examples of senior shared housing in Tazmania


A group of self-sufficient seniors living together in one of four shared homes created in Chicago by the nonprofit Senior Housing Share


Three Boomers aging in community in Ontario Canada


This Japanese example of a shared house features a younger set of housemates, but it’s pretty neat.


There are also some broader discussions of shared housing that look at the movement more deeply.


In Manchester, UK, people old and young discuss the desperate need for shared housing in their community.


Organizers Pat Dunn and Louise Bardswich discuss shared housing within the Aging in Community movement in Canada.


Margaret Manning and Bonnie Moore dig into why so many women over 60 are interested in shared housing.


Finally, I recently filmed a short video of my own covering what I have found works and what doesn’t from my own experiences with shared housing.


If you have found these videos helpful, join the conversation on Facebook.

And if you are ready to dig deeper, I have a next step for you to take.

I recently put together a FREE exercise just for you that I think you’ll find helpful. It’s actually repurposed from my book, Your Quest for Home.

It’s called Casting a Wider Net in 4 Easy Steps. It’s a mind mapping exercise designed to get you heading in the right direction when you are thinking of who might live in your shared house. While it’s designed for folks who are in the planning stage of creating their community, it should be interesting regardless of where you are in your journey.

To receive it, simply enter your email address below, and I’ll get it right to you. And if you decide to put it to work, please let me know! Seriously, I love that kind of feedback.

Sign up below to receive my free exercise for finding your people!

Feeling inspired to take the next step? Great!
Sign up now for my FREE exercise for finding potential community partners, Casting a Wider Net in 4 Easy Steps.

Please note: we do not share or sell your email information.

Free Webinar: Calling in Your Tribe During Uncertain Times

In the face of our global health crisis, many of us are wondering whether we have deep, sustainable connections with a community we can rely on when times get tough. Sadly, most of us would say, “No.”

We hunger for community. We want our tribe back. And that’s why I want to share an upcoming free webinar with you called “Calling in Your Tribe.” It’s being presented by two dear friends of mine, Bill Kauth & Zoe Alowan Kauth.

I have been through Bill & Zoe’s workshops many times both in person and in online classrooms. I organized bringing them and their training here to Asheville in recent years.

And it’s been through their inspiration, insight, and masterful facilitation that I have been able to create a tribe of my own. Now, they’re sharing some of what they have to offer with you through a free webinar that’s taking place on Tuesday, March 24. I highly encourage you to register now.

Until the coronavirus brought things to a halt, we’ve all been so over-busy, distracted, and siloed in our work or our primary relationship, that we’ve felt the hunger for deeper support…but it hasn’t appeared available or possible for us

Culturally, we’ve been led to believe that we don’t need each other and that building true community isn’t possible anymore.

The truth is we really do need each other…it’s deep in us. 

Do you feel the call to tribe? Would you like to become a conscious community-builder?

My dear friends, Bill Kauth and Zoe Alowan Kauth spent ten years figuring out how to make it happen, and what it takes – and they’ve been VERY successful. They’re now ready to share their secrets to successful tribe-building. Join them for their special, free online webinar:

Calling in Your Tribe:
Creating Your Own Heart-to-Heart Personal Communit
y

10 Inspiring Quotes about Shared Housing in Community

I have been collecting quotes lately related to shared housing from figures in the Aging in Community Movement, inspiring writers, and even a couple lines of my own.

If you could use some inspiration or just a shift in perception, I invite you to consider the quotes below. Please feel free to share them with others in your network if you think they’ll find them useful.

“We’re social beings – we’re really not meant to live alone.” – Kirby Dunn, Executive Director of HomeShare Vermont

“The ache for home lives in all of us, the safe place where we can go and not be questioned.” – Maya Angelou, poet & activist

“The converging factors that are driving increased interest around boomers in shared housing include culture change, health, longevity, and demographics.” – Marianne Kilkenny, Trailblazer, Grand Nudge & Founder of Women Living in Community

“We realize that the prospect of a life change as dramatic as creating a cooperative household could be very scary. It is important to acknowledge your emotional responses from the outset, as you start planning your version of a cooperative household.” Karen M. Bush, Louis S. Machinist, & Jean McQuillin, Authors of My House, Our House

“Across the nation, from Baltimore to Washington State, homeshare programs are cropping up as a way both to provide affordable housing and to help people age in place without being isolated.” – Beth Baker, Author of With a Little Help from Our Friends

“The company, the conversation, the sharing, the communication, the knowledge that some is there. It must be psychological, because life seems easier if you have someone going through it with you.” – Eric Klinberg, Author of Going Solo

“She was struck by the simple truth that sometimes the most ordinary things could be made extraordinary, simply by doing them with the right people.” – Nicholas Sparks, Author of The Lucky One

“I come home from a long trip to the West Coast exhausted from the time change and the joys of current air travel. As I turn into my driveway, I see that the lights are drawn. What a welcome sight for a woman living alone. I’m expected! Someone is welcoming me home.” – Marianne Kilkenny, author of You Quest for Home

“Expensive cities can be more affordable in groups.” – The Shared Housing Option

“Everyone has this universal understanding of roommate drama.” – Leighton Meester, actress


If you have found these quotes inspirational and want to share your thoughts, join the conversation on Facebook.

But if you are thinking about living in a shared house or have one already, I have another step for you to take. I am just releasing a FREE exercise just for you. It’s an excerpt from my book on finding your ideal community, Your Quest for Home.

It’s called Casting a Wider Net in 4 Easy Steps. In the exercise, I walk you through a four-part process of creating a mindmap that identifies people in your network who could be a good fit for your community in ever-expanding circles. Even if you are further down the road than the brainstorming stage, you still might find it interesting.

To receive it, simply sign up using the form below, and I’ll get it right to you. And if you decide to put it to work, please let me know! Seriously, I love that kind of feedback.

Sign up below to receive my free exercise for finding your people!

Feeling inspired to take the next step? Great!
Sign up now for my FREE exercise for finding potential community partners, Casting a Wider Net in 4 Easy Steps.

Please note: we do not share or sell your email information.

Live Event Recap: Connection, Information, Action in Sarasota, Florida

I recently held an exciting workshop in Sarasota, Florida dedicated to exploring shared housing hosted by the Senior Friendship Center. It was a great time, so I’d love to share some highlights with you!

Greeting participants at reception

The theme of this one day workshop was Connection, Information, Action, which I believe are the three main ingredients that it takes for getting community building off the ground.

I shared some of my own story and focused most of my session on how to get participants moving with their own shared housing projects. This included some resources and activities from my book, Your Quest for Home, that the audience got to participate in.


Here’s me doing my thing!


My close friend and colleague Linda Williams then shared information about the Living in Community Network, which is based in Sarasota. This organization encourages the creation of sustainable communities where residents live in a mutually supportive environment of friendship, shared values, life-long learning, and civic engagement.

My friend Linda Williams presenting the Living in Community Network

She’s got a great stage presence!

Jeanette Watling-Mills presented on behalf of the Senior Friendship Center’s Home Share Program, which connects working singles ages 23 years + with adult homeowners over the age of 60 who own their own home, and have a private bath and bedroom to share in exchange for rent.


Jeanette Watling-Mills shared information on the Senior Friendship Center

All in all, it turned out to be a very dynamic and information-packed afternoon. Afterward, a number of people invited me to do similar presentations with organizations in the Tampa area, which got me even more motivated.

Now that I’m back home in Asheville, North Carolina, I’m inspired to get moving on my next workshop here in town for Your Quest for Home, which will be offered here in town. I’ll be sharing more about that soon, so stay tuned!

I’ll end with a few more pics showing what a good time we had that day.


A great turnout!


The audience seemed to have a pretty good time! 🙂


Everyone left with some great resources for taking their next steps!


Sign up below to receive my free exercise for finding your people!

Feeling inspired to take the next step? Great!
Sign up now for my FREE exercise for finding potential community partners, Casting a Wider Net in 4 Easy Steps.

Please note: we do not share or sell your email information.

6 Shared Housing Books that Belong on Your Shelf

Wherever you are on your journey with Aging in Community, chances are that somebody has been there before. When it comes to the option of shared housing, we are lucky enough to have several people who have written some pretty great books about.

Below you’ll find six books that offer different perspectives on what shared housing is all about. Some of them tell the stories of people who have managed to make living with friends under one roof work for them. Others offer practical advice and exercises that you can put to work for yourself.

My House, Our House: Living Far Better for Far Less in a Cooperative Household by Karen M. Bush, Louis S. Machinist, and Jean McQuillin 

my house our house book cover

Authored by three female Boomers with plenty of hands-on experience with shared housing, My House, Our House belongs on the bookshelves of any reader who’s serious about sharing a home with others as they age. 

This book addresses the many challenges and perks of coliving as we age, particularly with other perennial women. The three trail-blazing women share their own journey of creating community with one another under a shared roof and what they learned along the way.

Told with humor, affection, and honesty, this book invites the reader to explore the challenges, practicalities, and joys of moving from “my house” to “our house.” 


If you’d like to learn more about this book, I encourage you to read my blog post spotlighting My House, Our House.

How to Start a Golden Girls Home by Bonnie Moore

One of the most common questions that I get when I share my own experience of living in a real world Golden Girls home is this:

“How can I find a community just like this for myself?”

While there are some ways of finding spaces and roommates for elder women out there, the truth is that most Golden Girls homes are created DIY by the women who want them the most.

That’s why I am so grateful that a book like How to Start a Golden Girls Home is out there. While it doesn’t happen overnight, creating a setting like this for yourself isn’t rocket science. Bonnie Moore shows us all how in this book with a guide that starts with finding the right people through handling sticky situations like pets and conflicts. 

Sharing Housing: A Guidebook for Finding and Keeping Good Housemates by Annamarie Pluhar

“Everyone has this universal understanding of roommate drama,” as actress Leighton Meester put it in one of my favorite quotes about shared housing.

Annamarie Pulmar knows this well, which may have been why she designed her book to serve as “a guidebook for finding and keeping good housemates.” It definitely delivers on this premise. 

Within the pages the reader will find concrete, actionable advice, such as: 

  • How to eliminate inappropriate people quickly and safely
  • How to write an ad
  • How to negotiate the details of living together
  • What kind of background checks and references are helpful

The book continues with chapters on actually living together what to expect and how to manage.

Your Quest for Home by Marianne Kilkenny

While it’s about more than just shared housing, I’m including my own book on this list because it offers relevant material that other books leave out. 

Your Quest for Home is designed to provide readers with a roadmap for taking ownership of their own journey with Aging in Community. It serves as a guidebook for figuring out what you are looking for in a community and how to find it.

When it comes to shared housing, far too many sit around waiting for the perfect opportunity to fall in their lap, which rarely happens. If you are ready to take the initiative and start finding the people you want to live with and figure out how, when, and where you’re going to make that happen, I encourage you to pick up a copy of your own.

Shared Living: Interior Design for Rented and Shared Spaces by Emily Hutchinson

Released in late 2019, Emily Hutchinson’s new book tackle’s another important topic to shared housing: optimizing the physical spaces that we share together. 

She wrote her book specifically for people who are currently living with roommates or are planning on doing it in the near future. And she covers just about every issue that I can think of when it comes to sharing residential spaces, such as merging styles and identifying what matters most when you are looking for a space.

Understanding that many people choose to live in shared housing in part for economic reasons, she also offers some practical advice on making the most of what you have, DIY interior design options from scratch, and sourcing one-of-a-kind elements by upcycling and finding great deals. 

Shared Living also offers a ton of examples of what roommates have come up with from around the country, including an impressive number of color illustrations.  

The Ladies of Covington Series by Joan Medlicott

Written by local author Joan Medlicott (one of my favorite people) from here in my home city of Asheville, the Ladies of Covington books occupy a special place in my heart. 

Starting with The Ladies of Covington Send Their Love, the entire series is an inspiring delight. Join this household of elder women as they make their way from a sad Pennsylvania boardinghouse to create a home for themselves in the mountains of western North Carolina. 

These books are a part of a literary genre referred to as Matron Lit, a subcategory of Boomer Lit, where older women are the primary protagonists. The Ladies of Covington Series is a favorite among fans for showing strong women choosing to live together to enhance their lives and relationships.

If you have found these books helpful yourself or know of others, join the conversation on Facebook.

If you are thinking about living in a shared house or have one already, I have another step for you to take.

I have released a FREE exercise just for you. It’s an excerpt from my book on finding your ideal community, Your Quest for Home.

It’s called Casting a Wider Net if 4 Easy Steps, and it’s designed to help you identify potential community collaborators in your network. In the exercise, I walk you through a four-part process of creating a mindmap that identifies people in your network who could be a good fit for your community in ever-expanding circles. Even if you are further down the road than the brainstorming stage, you still might find it interesting.

To receive it, simply sign up using the form below, and I’ll get it right to you. And if you decide to put it to work, please let me know! Seriously, I love that kind of feedback.

Sign up below to receive my free exercise for finding your people!

Feeling inspired to take the next step? Great!
Sign up now for my FREE exercise for finding potential community partners, Casting a Wider Net in 4 Easy Steps.

Please note: we do not share or sell your email information.

Classic Golden Girls Moments – Women Living in Community that Were Ahead of Their Time

The Golden Girls is a classic TV sitcom that has stood the test of time like few others. Watching it today, it’s amazing how well it has aged with its fully realized characters and pitch-perfect punchline delivery.

The show has also become a touchstone in the aging in community movement, frequently being cited as an example of senior coliving that resonates deeply for many of us. While living in shared housing can be more complex and challenging than the Golden Girls reflects, it’s also something that many elders have been able to work for them in real life, including myself.

But these women living in community in their Florida bungalow were ahead of their time in other ways as well. They took on the challenging issues of their day and shared points of view that are just as deeply resonate today as they were when they first aired.

Below are six great examples of The Golden Girls showing themselves to be a true example of women living in community that was ahead of their time. Fair warning: A couple of these clips are real tearjerkers.

The community accepts a new community member with Sophia’s arrival in Episode 1.


AIDS is not a bad person disease, Rose.


Blanche thinks she sees what Sophia is getting at about gay marriage…


Dorothy and Blanche confront Rose about her pain pill addiction.


Sophia talks with someone considering suicide like a friend. Like a best friend.


Condoms, condoms, condoms…


The Golden Girls legacy is part of my story as well, which you can learn more about in this interview I gave with NBC a few years ago.


If you have found these clips entertaining or have your own moments to share, join the conversation on Facebook.

Are you ready to take the next step in creating a real-life Golden Girls household of your own?

One common obstacle that I hear about from people who want to age in community but don’t know where to start is that they feel like they don’t know how to find the right people to live with.

That’s why I’ve put together the free download that you’ll find below, Casting a Wider Net in 4 Easy Steps.

In it you will find an exercise from my book, Your Quest for Home, that’s designed to help you think outside the box about how to find potential community members. It’s a simple guide for creating an expanding mind map of possibilities that you can complete in a single sitting.

If you’re up for the challenge, please take a moment to access the exercise now. And if you put it to work for yourself, please let me know!

Sign up below to receive my free exercise for finding your people!

Feeling inspired to take the next step? Great!
Sign up now for my FREE exercise for finding potential community partners, Casting a Wider Net in 4 Easy Steps.

Please note: we do not share or sell your email information.

Exploring Shared Housing Information Session

Click on this image for a printable flyer!

[VIDEO] Elderly? Senior citizen? Modern elder? Some of my thoughts on terminology

What’s the proper way to refer to older people? If you are getting up there yourself, how do you like to be addressed?

Maybe you prefer just to be seen as a human being and not defined by your age. Or maybe you are proud of your age and prefer terminology that honors the experience and wisdom you have to offer.

In this video, I share some of my own personal views on the topic. Take a look.

I’m curious what you have to say about these particular terms, too. Please take a moment to share which of these you particularly like or hate in the poll below.

Which term are you the most comfortable with?

If you answered “None of the above,” feel free to add what terminology you do prefer in the comment section at the bottom of this post.

Of course, we’re not the only ones with some strong feelings on terminology. The excerpt below from Beth Baker’s excellent book on aging in community,  With a Little Help from Our Friends, has some further examples.

“In a New York Times “New Old Age” blog, experts were asked what to call this demographic group now that baby boomers are among its younger members. There was little agreement–seniors, elders, the elderly–none seemed quite right. Even the word “aging” itself is so associated with decline that many reject it. (Teddi, seventy-six and a resident of the Burbank Senior Artists Colony, told me she preferred the term “recycled teen.”)

“The culture’s problem is that we split aging into good and bad,” Thomas Cole, director of the McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, explains, “We’re unable to sustain images of growing older that handle the tension between spiritual growth, the good, and physical decline, the bad. In the Hebrew Bible, aging is both a blessing and a curse. But our culture can’t achieve this kind of synthesis.”

A senior cohousing community in Santa Fe even decided to change its name from ElderGrace to Sand River because of the connotation. “The main reason is, we have some men in our community who didn’t want to tell anybody where they lived – they felt it created an image of gray-haired people walking around with walkers,” explained Marty, a resident there. “People asked if it was assisted living. I actually had someone I ran into who came to dinner and she asked if we’d sold the last two units in ‘ElderCare.’ That convinced me.”

In a 2013 piece on NPR headlined “For Elder Midwife, Delivering Babies Never Gets Old,” about a 71-year old practitioner, a huge out-cry erupted over the label “elderly,” including a complaint from the midwife. (As an example of how language evolves, one commenter on a Washington Post blog reminded readers that humorist Stan Freeburg in 1957 rewrote the lyrics to a classic show tune, singing “Elderly Man River,” since the word “old” had been censored.) In fact, journalists are now advised to avoid any descriptor such as “elderly” for fear of offending someone. “Use this word carefully and sparingly,” according to the Associated Press Stylebook.

What are your thoughts on the appropriately terms to use for folks as they age? Feel free to join the conversation in the comments below or in our thread of the Women Living in Community Facebook page.

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Aging in Community 2019 Update

Progress in the Aging in Community Movement: 

Three Themes You Need to Know About

In 2019, today’s elders are taking ownership of aging in community like never before. As I’ve been tracking the developments, some major themes have started standing out, and I’d like to take this opportunity to share them with you now. 

When I look at the movement today, I’m equally excited by how far we’ve come in some areas and daunted by how far we still have to go in others.

Recent trends in aging in community show a generation that is revolutionizing how people we will live in our homes and stay connected with the community as we age. I outline what I view as some of the biggest successes and challenges of our movement below.

Together, we stand poised to change the face of aging in our society. But we’ll only get there if we show up and do what it takes. 

I’ve been hard at work for the last several months working on my own foundation for aging in community. I urge you to do the same.

Theme #1: Aging in Community Approaches Critical Mass

When I first started writing, speaking, and organizing about this topic more than ten years ago, there weren’t that many people who were talking about aging in community. There were just a handful of leaders out there with a limited audience of people who were taking the topic seriously. 

And it was a little frustrating sometimes talking over and over with people who seemed to be waiting for someone else to build their ideal community for them and just tell them about. And that’s NOT how it works.

But I don’t feel like I’m a lone voice in the night anymore. Today, it feels like we are turning a corner with enough of us waking up. More people than ever are taking ownership of how and where they are going to age and who they are going to do it with. There is a momentum caused by enough people getting involved and becoming for the change they want to see in the world that the Aging in Community movement is making real progress. 

Charles Durrett leading a cohousing workshop

I see this in news sources I watch where there are headlines about new communities, housing alternatives, related housing initiatives, and resources in the news everyday. 

I see it in changes in legislation like the Golden Girls Act up in Canada. 

I see this in educational programs and workshops that are taking place this year like Charles Durrett’s workshop at the 2019 National Cohousing Conference. I have a presentation coming up myself introducing alternative housing choices to a new group near Asheville, NC locally at a retreat in October 2019 called 50Forward.  

I also see this in the thriving online communities that are really growing and buzzing with activity, particularly on Facebook. Some are general interest groups about housing alternatives for older folks like Sixty and Me. Others serve the needs of specific groups, such as Elder OrphansWomen Living in Community, and Decolonizing the Crone

And it’s all happening because enough people are showing up and making it happen. 

Theme #2: Boomers are Leading the Residential Revolution in Community Building, Especially Cohousing

Interest in community living has also really picked up steam for people of all ages have gotten tired of living in an isolated world and refuse to do it anymore. But its older people who are leading the charge in most cases, cohousing in particular. 

More than 160 cohousing communities have been formed in the United States since it was introduced to the country in the 1980’s. At least 125 additional cohousing communities are being developed right now. 

And, if you visit most of them, you’ll find that the founders and most of the people living there tend to be  boomers who have chosen to age in community and made it happen. 

If you would like to dig deeper on this trend, I have some further resources below:

Theme #3: Unprecedented Pace in Creating More Alternative Structures & Repurpose Existing Structures for Aging in Community 

It doesn’t seem like a month has gone by that I haven’t heard of some exciting new developments in alternative housing design. And most of these structures are designed for boomers who have realized that they are the first generation to be able to choose what types of structures they are going to age in a way that no generation before could have dreamed was possible. 

Here are a couple of examples of alternative structures that can easily be incorporated into aging in community.

Minka Homes

The latest creation of Dr. Bill Thomas, Minka believe it’s time for a new housing story. Minka designs, pre-fabricates and delivers sensibly-sized kit homes that can either stand alone, act as accessory dwelling units or be combined to develop pocket neighborhoods.

She Sheds

A small building separate from the main home, reserved specifically for the use of an adult woman, in which she can relax and pursue her interests. While they were designed to be the female equivalent of an outdoor man cave, they can also provide community designers with interesting options for pocket neighborhoods.

Repurposing Existing Properties for Seniors in 2019

At the same time, there is a growing interest in finding innovative new ways of repurposing structures that we already have. And seniors sharing homes has been on the rise for a while now.

Several years ago, I lived in a community for seniors on this model in which I lived with a handful of other great women (click here for a video all about it). Together, we lived in a house that was originally designed for an average family that we repurposed for aging in community as women living together in an intentional environment.

Here are three examples of similar projects that are getting off the ground in 2019.

  • The Oak Hill coliving home is an example of something similar that formed in 2019 thanks to Canada’s Golden Girl Act. 
  • Hibiscus Commons is a new senior cooperative housing project that is part of the Bay Area Community Land Trust that has a focus on exploring affordable options. They are doing so by finding ways to repurpose unused or underutilized properties. 
  • Village Hearth is an LGBT-focused, ages 55+, community in Durham, NC, with 15 acres of wooded land just 20 minutes from downtown. 

These are just a few examples of the types of projects that have gotten established recently. There are many more.

My recent experience with some of the above:

Until early 2019, I was developing a pocket neighborhood that was designed to incorporate both repurposing an existing home and building new modular structures for aging in community. 

This included using a mid-century ranch house that would have functioned as a community center and coliving opportunity for a few people, plus a series of six to twelve modular homes for people desiring shared space.

You can learn more about this project in my own 2019 personal update

Moving forward and what’s to come

The Grand Nudge wants you to take ownership of whether and how you age in community.

While there’s a lot to be excited about in the world of aging in community, it’s important to understand that your ideal community isn’t just going to land on your doorstep in 2019 or any time soon. As some of you know, that’s a message that The Grand Nudge believes in very strongly.

It’s up to you to take ownership of how you age and be the captain of your own quest for home. If you are new to the topic or could use some tools in exploring this journey, I encourage you to explore my book, My Quest for Home.

And there’s also a lot that still needs to happen moving forward within the Aging in Community movement, particularly in the areas of affordable housing, getting local governments on board, and creating good matching services for senior housing. 

I hope that you found this update on themes I’m seeing in the Aging in Community helpful. 

If you’re not already signed up, be sure to subscribe for updates from the Women Living in Community Network now. That’s the easiest way to know when a new post has been published. 

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[VIDEO] Marianne & Friends in “When I’m 65” Recording – Aging in Community

I want to share a video that I did with my friends a while back.

I’m passing this along because I think it encapsulates something important that I want you to really see.

Aging in community is beautiful and real, and it’s something that you can really do

Yes, it takes some planning, discernment, and guts. It requires investing some time, money, and hard work.

But when it all comes together, the rewards are worth it.

This is how we as women were meant to live. Together in community, supporting one another as we age in a nourishing and heart-centered environment.

It’s something that you can do to0. And you might be closer to making it a reality than you think

Maybe you already have a group of friends who would be perfect for this sort of thing if you could find the right spot. Or maybe you already have access to a house, condo, or complex and just need to find your tribe.

Speaking as The Grand Nudge for a moment, you’ve got take ownership of where you are going to end up as you age. You can’t keep waiting for someone to build your community for you and track you down to tell you about it.

If you’re ready to get started with or reassess your aging in community journey, I’ve got some questions for you.

These questions form the basis of my Guidebook, “Your Quest for Home”, and help you define how you wish to live in your later years.

I’ve created a free download of these questions that I encourage you to download. If you haven’t already joined the Women Living in Community network, sign up now and I’ll send it right over.

Join the Women Living in Community Network and get my community building questions now!

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If you are already a subscriber, you can access the questions from my book here.

Women For Living in Community